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October 11, 2017



Drawing Room Confessions presents… Stuart Brisley

Cover of Drawing Room Confessions #12: Stuart Brisley. The cover image is determined by the question ‘Which famous actor or singer, dead or alive, could play you in a film?’ Stuart Brisley replied: "Herbert Lom." Photo: Ronald Grant Archive/Alamy.

 

Drawing Room Confessions: Stuart Brisley is available to purchase on Unbound.

Louise Garrett from Central Saint Martins and some of her students from MA Culture, Criticism and Curation respond to Drawing Room Confessions.

Coinciding with the archive display Q & A: Artists in Conversation at the Whitechapel Gallery (11 March–27 August 2017), Drawing Room Confessions invited me to organize an event to celebrate their latest issue (#12), dedicated to Stuart Brisley. Drawing Room Confessions, founded in London in 2011 by artist Manuela Ribadeneira, curator Vincent Honoré, and design collective Åbäke, is a journal that plays with the serious (and playful) game of conversation. For each issue, the editors invite one artist to take part in a number of conversations with different interlocutors from a range of fields. Brisley’s interlocutors in Drawing Room Confessions #12 are Jem Finer, Maya Balcioglu and Francesca Hughes. The annotated sections of the publication follow a set of rules designed to present a nuanced portrait of the artist at a particular moment in time.

An impetus for the event was an observation made by Jem Finer, one of Brisley’s interlocutors in Drawing Room Confessions #12, in which he likened the reach of Stuart’s practice to a “drone.” This musical analogy suggests, according to Jem: “Something rich and constant around which everything else revolves […] enriching by ever increasing connections, and its meaning changes in relation to how the world has changed.” Elaborating on the conversational format of Drawing Room Confessions, this image of Stuart’s practice as a drone resonating and reverberating around permeable networks of art practice and thinking over time underpinned the structure of the Whitechapel event, which was as much about thinking about the potentiality of art as social exchange as it was about enacting it.

Stuart Brisley, Drawn, 2016. Four-day performance in David Roberts Art Foundation studio, London. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Hales London New York, Mitchell Algus Gallery. Copyright the artist. Photo: Maya Balcioglu.

 

 In terms of a wider context for forms of practice that favour collectivity, contingency and horizontal principles – a set of conditions that decentralises the artist as an authorial figure – we can step sideways from Stuart’s practice as an artist to his work as a teacher and mentor in the context of the art school. Stuart’s demonstrative teaching activities began at Hornsey College of Art in the 60s, where he became involved in the 1968 sit-ins at Crouch Hill, effectively protesting prevailing authoritarian teaching practices in British art school education. This action was followed by a long-term association with the Slade School of Fine Art where he started – in 1969 – in the role of student advisor, a faculty position elected by the students themselves. This collapsing of hierarchies represents a significant thread running through Stuart’s art and teaching practice, in which a democratic basis between artist and audience, or teacher and student, proposes a collective and critically engaged model for participation – a sort of “town hall meeting without town officials,” which is how Stuart described the collaborative aspect of his Artist Placement Group commission in the New Town of Peterlee in the 1970s. The idea of authority in a learning situation, according to Stuart, was to be thought of as “a shared material within space and context.”

Stuart Brisley, Drawn, 2016. Four-day performance in David Roberts Art Foundation studio, London. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Hales London New York, Mitchell Algus Gallery. Copyright the artist. Photo: Maya Balcioglu.

 

In an attempt to emulate this type of model, I avoided the standard format of the “in conversation with” the artist, in which the artist is called on to perform the role of eminent “genius.” I also tried to open out the conventional structure of the panel discussion by discarding the mediator and instead inviting a number of guests to take part in a chain of conversations which began and ended with Stuart, but in which neither Stuart nor his practice were necessarily the fixed or prescribed “subject.” While Stuart’s work may have been the implicit subject of the conversations, the proposition embedded in the structure of the event implied that it was the collective responsibility of all the participants in the conversation to alter, adapt and transform what that “subject” might be. This reflects the form of the conversation itself as never finite, pre-scribed or fixed, but rather a mutating set of constellations with its own network of ever-shifting co-ordinates and relations.

Stuart Brisley, Drawn, 2016. Four-day performance in David Roberts Art Foundation studio, London. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Hales London New York, Mitchell Algus Gallery. Copyright the artist. Photo: Maya Balcioglu.

 

So, who were the agents in this collective action? Three of them – Hayley Newman, John Seth and Anne Tallentire – are artists, and Michael Newman is an art historian and critical theorist who has written key essays on Stuart’s work. Hayley, John and Anne all went through Stuart’s innovative Media Fine Art course at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. Anne started a post-graduate degree on the course in 1986, where she met fellow student John, and since then the pair has frequently collaborated in a practice formalised as work-seth/tallentire. Hayley went through the course in the early 1990s, and returned to the Slade as a teacher in 2011. Michael was a colleague of the artist when he was head of Art History and Theoretical Studies at the Slade between 1994 and 1998. The conversations between this group of coincidental associates implied a microcosm of wider networks of live art practice in which the effect of Brisley’s work and influence resonates like one of the most basic yet most fertile of harmonic devices: the drone. 

Hayley Newman, Record, Slade School of Fine Art Postgraduate Degree Show, 1994. Courtesy the artist. Photo: Sarah Cole.

 

In the middle of the Whitechapel conversation, there was an exchange between John and Anne that seemed relevant to the envisaged structure. Here it is recalled by the artists:

The experience that durational performance offers is a radical break from the idea of a ‘whole’ or ‘complete’ experience. There is no complete narrative that needs to be grasped to be able to apprehend or engage with the artwork. Even the smallest aspect, a fragment, of the work becomes the work. The fragment, then, is not a broken-off bit of a pre-existing whole, but rather an incompleteness that is, at the same time, complete. It is both. Even if the entire work had been endured, it would necessarily be incomplete or partial (an experience dependent upon a point-of-view or position, related to the time experienced, and so on...).

Reflecting this idea, and as an extension of the recursive device linking the publication and the event, I asked three of my current and former MA Culture, Criticism and Curation students at Central Saint Martins to write a brief account of the Whitechapel conversations, which I am pleased to present: 

Read here

Louise Garrett

 

work-seth/tallentire, Yes, let’s go, 10-hour durational performance for The Sum of the Parts, South London Gallery, 2002. Courtesy the artists.

 

Stuart Brisley, Drawn, 2016. Four-day performance in David Roberts Art Foundation studio, London. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Hales London New York, Mitchell Algus Gallery. Copyright the artist. Photo: Maya Balcioglu.

 

Biographies

Stuart Brisley, born 1933, Haslemere. In a career spanning over 60 years he has consistently probed social and political issues in his work. He was a founding member of the Artists’ Union England and following the Hornsey College of Art sit-in, which he helped to organise, his appointment to the faculty of the Slade School by the votes of the students remains unique. His work is held in numerous museums including MoMA and Tate.

Anne Tallentire’s primarily time-based practice questions the significance of the mundane and overlooked in relation to urban conditions and contexts. Working in range of media including video, performance, photography, print and drawing, exhibitions and projects include As Far As, Hollybush Gardens, London and Shelter, Nerve Visual, Derry (2016); Object of a life, Copy Press (2013) and This and other Things, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010). She also works collaboratively with John Seth as work-seth/tallentire, is co-organiser of Hmn with Chris Fite-Wassilak, and is represented by Hollybush Gardens, London.

John Seth is an artist, writer and lecturer. His work has been included in the Hmn5 (2016) and in exhibitions at Sala Chillida Bizkaia Aretoa, Bilbao (2014); Five Years, London (2012); The Lethaby Gallery, London (2010). His work was also included in the Aichi and Setouchi Triennales, Japan (2013). He is the 4D Pathway Leader for the BA Fine Art course and convener for the Duration and Event research group at Central Saint Martins. His art practice since 1993 includes an on-going collaboration with Anne Tallentire as work-seth/tallentire. Their work has most recently been exhibited at Hollybush Gardens, London (2017, 2015) and previously at Fri Art, Fribourg (2004); ENSBA, Paris (2004); South London Gallery (2002), Orchard Gallery, Derry (2000), Project Art Centre, Dublin (1998).

Hayley Newman is an artist with a passion for humour, subjectivity, documentary practices and fiction. She creates performances, interventions, music and texts and has made work in nightclubs, shops, on trains and marches as well as concert halls and galleries. In 2011, she declared herself self-appointed artist-in-residence in the City of London and wrote the novella Common, drawing together social, economic and ecological crises. She often works in collaboration, most recently with eco-electro girl-band The Gluts who took their musical Café Carbon to the Copenhagen Climate Summit, and art/activist group Liberate Tate. Newman lives and works in London and is represented by Matt’s Gallery.

Michael Newman is Professor of Art Writing at Goldsmiths, University of London. He has published numerous essays on modern and contemporary artists, as well as thematic essays on the wound, the horizon, contingency, memory, drawing, and nonsense. He is the author of Richard Prince Untitled (couple) (2006), Jeff Wall: Works and Writings (2007), Price, Seth (2010) and ‘Stuart Brisley: Performing the Political Body and Eating Shit’ in Stuart Brisley (2015). He is co-editor of Rewriting Conceptual Art (1999) and The State of Art Criticism (2007). The exhibitions he has curated include Tacita Dean at York University, Toronto, Revolver2 (contemporary artists) at Matt’s Gallery, London, and ‘Drawing after Bellmer in Europe, North America and Japan’ will be at The Drawing Room, London. The first volume of his selected writings, ‘I know very well…but all the same’: Essays on Artists of the Still and Moving Image is forthcoming with Ridinghouse.

Stuart Brisley, Drawn, 2016. Four-day performance in David Roberts Art Foundation studio, London. Courtesy the artist and Galeria Jaqueline Martins, Hales London New York, Mitchell Algus Gallery. Copyright the artist. Photo Maya Balcioglu.
September 29, 2017



Fierce Festival on Unbound

Fierce Festival returns to venues across Birmingham this October (16th – 22nd). This year sees the first festival under the helm of new Artistic Director Aaron Wright. The programme features over 50 events providing the perfect opportunity to see work from leading UK and international performance makers working at the edges of practice.

To celebrate we have made a collection of titles including/about artists in this years Fierce Festival and a few favourites selected by Aaron Wright. In addition there is a 20% discount code available in the festivals’ programme.

 

Aaron Wright:

"My first encounters with Live Art were grainy clips of David Hoyle on YouTube and a found brochure for a ‘Fierce Festival’ picked up in Birmingham Library as a teenager, both in the mid-noughties. In the time since, much has changed. In 2005 Live Art hadn’t been embraced by the institution, the local library did not have a copy of ‘From Futurism to Present’, and Marina Abramovic certainly wasn’t a household name. Ten years on and, to paraphrase Lois Keidan, the internet has made the underground accessible by the click of a button. Whilst information is now more freely accessible than ever before, in 2017 we find ourselves saturated with an abundance of information, more than we could ever possibly read let alone digest and critique. Anyone can use Google – but do they always know what to look for?

Unbound is a much regarded editor in this respect, guiding us as to what to look at and what’s important – not just in regards to art history, but in terms of politics and representation too. Major publications sit next to self published artist books, and painstakingly sourced rare DVDs. When I worked at Unbound I spent weeks tracking down the publisher of the Johanna Went DVD Club Years. Eventually I found 20 copies which we ordered and sold on at cost price, enabling this rare item to be purchased, watched, shared and analysed in the UK for the first time. Over a number of years the DVDs trickled out and in doing so, word of Went’s incredible body of work slowly spread – okay, perhaps only to a niche few, but those that did see it, knew that it mattered, something which would never have happened without Unbound curating and distributing such a considered and useful selection of titles.

I’m delighted to select some of my favourite titles on Unbound as well as publications complimentary to this Fierce Festival programmes past and present."

 

Rose English Front Cover
Abstract Vaudeville The Work of Rose English

Ed. Martha Fleming
Book
£37.00


Cassils Front cover
Cassils: Artist Book
David J. Getsy and Julia Steinmetz
Book
£31.50


Club years cover
Club Years
Johanna Went
DVD
£16.95


Gardens Speak, front cover
Gardens Speak
Tania El Khoury
Book
£12.00


It's All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howell, Front cover
It's All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howells
Eds. Deirdre Heddon & Dominic Johnson
Book
£20.00


Magazine front cover
Magazine
David Hoyle
DVD
£10.00

 

Performance Art: From futurism to the present, front cover
Performance Art: From Futurism to the Present
RoseLee Goldberg
Book
£9.95


The Thrill of It front cover
The Thrill Of It All
Forced Entertainment
DVD
£41.50


William Pope.L Front cover
William Pope.L: The Friendliest Black Artist in America
Ed. Mark H. C. Bessire
Book
£21.95

August 31, 2017



Guest Editor: Julie Tolentino

Guest Editor Sale from 1 September 2017 - 30 September 2017
(We are moving in the first week of September, so you can still order from Unbound, but they will not be dispatched until 12 September. We apologise for any inconvenience)

 

Julie Tolentino is a US based artist, organiser, curator and editor. She will be in the UK to take part in The Vigils strand of ]performance s p a c e['s Wake programme in Folkestone on Saturday 28 October 2017.

She is the co-editor of the book Ellen Cantor's I'm Still Coming based on the 1993 show Coming To Power - 25 years of Sexually X-plicit Art by Women which will be available on Unbound.

 

In youth’s spring it was my lot,
to haunt of the wide earth a spot
to which I could not love the less
so lovely was the loneliness
of a wild lake, with black rock bound
and the tall trees that towered around
…My infant spirit would awake
to the terror of the lone lake

yet that terror was not fright
but a tremulous delight
and a feeling undefined
spring from a darkened mind
death was in that poisoned wave
and in its gulf a fitting grave
for him who thence could solace bring
to his dark imagining
… (lyrics from The Lake, Antony & The Johnsons, from Edgar Allen Poe’s The Lake)


My practice is often unpractical. It claims to do, and be, so many things and it functions along thick and thin lines. It misses its mark and sometimes senses things before its time. It never is on time.

I offer handmade surfaces (The Foxes) – one even that leaves oily scented fingerprints as a dance, as memory, as tribute (Queerer Than Thou, for J.E. Munoz). This body of work smokes and bellows (Raised by Wolves) and it bleeds (It Will All End in <Ultra-Red> Tears) and seeps (Untitled for Tom). My work takes the form of an archive (The Sky Remains The Same) and exists without a face (Passerby). In The Voids, one crawls in, gets lost. There is evidence of a sleight of hand, a younger bare ass, or a slight signature touch: single golden threads (Sling) weaved with the durational (A True Story About Two People) or are, in a duet with Pigpen, drenched in Honey. There’s a how-did-we-get-here lifetime of physical research, movement, meditation, touch - including Eastern and Aquatic, folded into one-to-one performance, videos, sound-scores, installations and all include objects/fragments/texts, embedded into us, scattered and uncharted amongst people and places.

I am a host, lover, an overgrown forever angsty teenager, a nervous hot mess, a sharp tack, a curator, and a performance type who believes that things are ideal when conditions are solid yet rolls with the precarious yet wily vulnerability of falling apart slightly in front of you, of sliding with others, a deliberate in and out, making a mess of possibilities, staying on past the when of “when things get dull,” or “when there’s not much left.” Don’t hate me for that, dearest reader. Some of us are slow, clunky, whole books waiting to be read in the dark.


Dear Unbound:

“I want you to want me,” the books whisper to me into the wide darkness.

I know how you feel, I say.

There is everything and everyone to want when one reaches Unbound.

I started with an imaginary commission of a 1000 sterling note paired with the right to wander, with exculpatory and reckless compound sentences filled with too many thoughts and prepositional phrases, and pauses, and commas, while dashing and clicking through the store, amongst the stacks, back and forth through time, familiarity, and categories.

I sorted and re-sorted, reconfigured my need, tuned my seeing.

I kept checking in on what I might be feeling, conjuring, forgetting, getting.

I became something else all together, unfamiliar but hungry.

I chose beloveds, omitted monographs, then omitted beloveds and chose only stranger-monographs.

I noted the geniuses and the missing.

I found political movements and classic refusals, must-haves, hallowed notebooks, new materialisms.

I looked up what I never heard of.

I discovered what I never had.

I admitted what I’d lost.

I shamelessly found my names in footnotes or tucked into chapters hoping to be remembered.

I searched for what was timely, old-fashioned, old-school, materials-based, movement-centric, feminist, text-based, influential, social, future-forward.

I imagined the trends.  

I sought out trouble-makers and kept changing keywords. Performances don’t make themselves – they lure you.


I looked at covers, chose by title, reassigned my aesthetics, rejected others, went wild for everything [insert-artist-name-here]. What’s queer or dull or misunderstood, extreme, solo? What say the directors, writers, site-sensitivos, the poets? Who devises installation, film, video, photographs, scents, clothing, books and who is changing, leaving, arriving, making it, been here all along? Questions arose: How will they find Marcia’s 12 Shooters, or the Performance Magazine Online cover featuring Derek Jarman, or the moment that Fred’s In The Break sits side-by-side with Cixous’ Stigmata? How can I not include him? Or them? Where the hell is she? Or shouldn’t she be in here by now? And the gossip: Who was invited to Katherine Arianiello’s Dinner Party?

I dared to recommend ancient-formats: audio cds, dvd videos.

I even fingered the study guides.

I played like I was shopping for myself, for friends, for lovers, for mentees, for students, for a lost audience member and the over-enthusiastic one & sometimes for the questioning brilliant-frustrated-fucked-up-yet-barely-hanging-in-there artists, trying to see themselves unbound.

I could touch and taste the time and spaces – I was there! We shared a program! I remember them when! They changed me forever! – and remember the ache of missing a show, a shift, a death, a moment.

I saw myself greedy, needy.

I want it all.

Unsolicited advice: keep going where no one sees you linked by the remnants and surrounded by your books. Libidinal research is tangled with liveness and its unknown simmering. It is always falling – out of a crevice, a slit, a hole – and a gesture bursts with it, penetrating, and lingering.

With love,

Performance
aka Live Art


Tolentino’s newest performance based works include: After the Future, 2017, Passerby 1, 2017 (& Passerby 2, upcoming), The Voids, 2015; objects (Double Happiness or Nothing, The Sling), video (What you won’t do for love, 2015, Evidence, 2015 for Visual AIDS curated by Tom Kalin). She has been making and collaborating as an artist and organizer since the ‘90s, including originating New York’s Clit Club, Dagger, and Tattooed Love Child. She is the co-editor and co-curator of the book/exhibition ELLEN CANTOR’s I’m Still Coming based on the 1993 show “Coming To Power – 25 Years of Sexually X-plicit Art by Women (coming soon to UNBOUND) and co-editor of THE DRAMA REVIEW (TDR)’s Provocations. She is the current one-year HMD San Francisco Community Engagement Artist and guest artist, with Debra Levine and Scot Nakagawa and the Hard Corps, in the 2017 Bridge Project: Radical Movements. Tolentino splits her time in California – in the Mohave Desert & at the edge of the woods off Highway 1 with Pigpen aka Stosh Fila and Sir Griffin. Upcoming appearances Fall-Winter 2018: New York Art Book Fair, ]performance space[: Sex, Thessaloniki Biennial, Greece, Manila Biennial, Philippines. With Kia Labeija, she will be featured in an upcoming publication: Visual AIDS’ DUET series.

 

I want you to know me and drown in the world with flickers of light and read through voices of artists who take on the world of interruptions, potential, and liveness.

Here is Information. Mobilise. Selected writings by Ian White
Ed. Mike Sperlinger
Book

£16.50 / Original Price £22

Here Is Information. Mobilise. Selected writings by Ian White book cover

 

The theatre colludes without repair with lovers who write over and over and over again.

Exquisite Pain
Forced Entertainment
DVD

£41.50 (Not included in the sale)

Exquisite Pain

 

I want you to prick me & change me & take my pulse & meet matriarchs and diviners. 

Pain in Soul
He Chengyao
Book

Sold Out 

Pain in Soul

 

Bifo clocks the site of capitalism / 24 hour pressures and offers contour to the chaotic digital touch-and-grope upon your intuition & dares to return us to the possibility to love dangerously.

The Soul at Work
Franco 'Bifo' Berardi
Book

£10.46/Original Price £13.95

The Soul at Work

 

On Embracing & Potential: Massumi starts with movement, untimeliness, feeling/thinking events, abduction

No Such Thing As Rest: A Walk with Brian Massumi
Hugo Glendinning and Adrian Heathfield
DVD
£9.38/Original Price £12.50

No Such Thing As Rest

 

I imagine us in here, doing it. 

Invisible Things
Fevered Sleep
Book
£13.49/Original Price £17.99

Invisible Things

 

We could purchase as a group, a collector co-op and pass to each other from continent to continent, season to season – or I could keep this all to myself.

My...hurts
Franko B
Edition
£350 (Not included in the sale)

My ... hurts

  

Political & “edges of form and poetics”, I follow this lead.

Extra Territorialities in Occupied Worlds
Eds. Maayan Amir and Ruti Sela
Book
£13.13/Original Price £17.50

Extra Territorialities in Occupied Worlds

 

First ladies of art & sex – the world changers.

Adrian Piper: Race, Gender and Embodiment
John P. Bowles
Book
£17.99/Original Price £23.99

Adrian Piper: Race, Gender and Embodiment

Art Sex Music
Cosey Fanni Tutti
Book
£11.24/Original Price £14.99 

Art Sex Music

 

Oh Tim & Co. – how dare you ask me to choose!

Club of No Regrets
Forced Entertainment
DVD
£41.50 (Not included in the sale)

Club of No Regrets

 

Because of your steps running parallel along a Wall where you ultimately started a new life and because I always wanted to know you more than just in pictures.

Whispers: Ulay on Ulay
Maria Rus Bojan and Alessandro Cassin
Book
£24/Original Price £32

Whispers: Ulay on Ulay

 

I am a child of these times – never forget.

Isaac Julien: Riot
Isaac Julien, Glenn D. Lowry
Book
£26.25/Original Price £35 

Isaac Julien: Riot

Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz
Cynthia Carr
Book
£11.24/Original Price £14.99

Fire in the Belly

 

Who are these young artists? 

A Contemporary Struggle
Jamila Johnson-Small and Alexandrina Hemsley

Book
£7.50/Original Price £10

A Contemporary Struggle

 

It takes these ungovernables to trace the field:

Venice International Performance Art Week - Hybrid Body - Poetic Body
Eds. Andrea Pagnes and Verena Stenke
Book
£24/Original Price £32

Venice International Performance Art Week

Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art History
Eds. Amelia Jones and Erin Silver
Book
£18.74/Original Price £24.99

Otherwise: Imagining Queer Feminist Art Histories

The Incorrigibles: Perspectives on Disability Visual Arts in the 20th and 21st Centuries
Eds. Adrian Plant and Tanya Raabe-Webber
Book
£9.74/Original Price £12.99 

The Incorrigibles

Empty Stages, Crowded Flats: Performativity as Curatorial Strategy
Eds. Florian Malzacher and Joanna Warsza
Book
£8.24/Original Price 10.99

Empty Stages 

Break:
Listening to “When I Grow Up” – Fever Ray:


When I grow up
I want to be a forester
Run through the moss on high heels
That's what I'll do

 

Live Forever: Collecting Live Art
Ed. Teresa Calonje
Book
£13.46/Original Price £17.95

Live Forever: Collecting Live Art

Documenting Performance: /the Context and Processes of Digital Curation and Archiving
Ed. Toni Sant
Book
£16.49/Original Price £21.99 

Documenting Performance

 

Staring at the seashell
Waiting for it to embrace me

 

Buying books is like walking backwards on the diving board.
With your full basket, take a chance to re-direct surrounded by sound.

Listen 


Perhaps one merely needs a little nudge to say, yes. So, when you hear the lyric:


“waiting for a moment to arise”

Action:
Go back to your open tab: Unbound shopping cart

Touch the box: CHECK OUT/PURCHASE aka fall in.

Guest Editor, Andy Field


Guest Editor Sale from 1 July 2017 - 31 July 2017

Andy Field is an artist, writer and the co-director of Forest Fringe.

Let’s change the world
Yeah! Let’s change the world
Not a little (a little)
A lot (a lot!)
Let’s change the world
Yeah! Let’s change the world
(‘Let’s Change the World’, traditional) 

About seven years ago I was on the campus of Warwick University, just outside Coventry, for an event hosted by Fierce Festival and Warwick Arts Centre. As part of this event an artist called Eitan Buchalter waited at a zebra crossing for four hours. I remember very vividly his calmness and his neatness, arms by his side, gazing out across the street, like a young mathematics teacher who had lost himself in the middle of a quadratic equation and slipped quietly into a fugue state. The sun shone thinly on the neat green lawns and the childlike bends in the tiny campus roads.

Inevitably as cars would arrive at the zebra cross they would pause for a few seconds, anticipating that Eitan was about to cross, and on realising that he was not going anywhere, they would move on. Some would occasionally beep as if attempting to wake him from his trance or chastise him for his transgression of the traditional etiquette of zebra crossings. It was so beautifully tiny, his action, so delicately fleeting; like a bird flying backwards. A hiccup in an otherwise ordinary afternoon.

For one man, however, it was not such a small indiscretion. One man was furious. He shouted at Eitan, questioning what he was doing and why he was doing it, and on receiving no response he took it upon himself to right the miniature wrong that had been inserted into the day, shouting at cars as they stopped that it was ‘an art thing’ and that they shouldn’t stop. ‘What a waste of time’ he said, repeatedly. ‘He could be out raising money for homeless people.’

Since that day I have often wondered what it was that so provoked the furious man. Was it, as he would have it, the uselessness of the action, its essential meaninglessness when placed against other possible things that Eitan could have chosen to do with his time, like raising money for homeless people? In this context, it is the choice of action that is so egregious. Eitan clearly has dedication and endurance, and yet he is employing them in pursuit of something the furious man perceives as without purpose or outcome. Why choose to do something as indulgent and inconclusive as art when there is so much suffering in the world?

Or is there another possible cause of the furious man’s ire? Could it be that it is not the ineffectuality of Eitan’s performance that is upsetting him but on the contrary, its very effectiveness? How easily Eitan is able to send these ripples of disruption out into the world, his mere motionlessness stopping traffic, his small transgression unstitching the unspoken rules that hold the world together. Is this what the furious man is afraid of, that far from being useless, art is a virus with the power to topple civilisations?

Here are some books that I think might help us to resolve these questions. For the month of July 2017, these have all been discounted by 25%

The Art Of Living: An Oral History - Book CoverThe Art of Living: An Oral History of Performance Art
Dominic Johnson
£16.49 / Original Price £21.99
These extraordinary lives are holding open space in which to re-imagine gender, identity, the way we relate to one another and the way we live in the world.

The Interventionists - Book Cover

The Interventionists
Eds. Nato Thompson, Gregory Sholette
£18.71 / Original Price £24.95
A catalogue of strategies for resistance.

Vacuum Days - Book Cover

Vacuum Days
Tim Etchells
£14.25 / Original Price £19
A document of a project that spanned a remarkable year and in so doing became implicitly bound up in the strangeness, to the point where it seemed Tim Etchells might be writing the world into existence. 

Out of Now - Book Cover
Out of Now: The Lifeworks of Tehching Hsieh
Adrian Heathfield and Tehching Hsieh
£24 / Original Price £32.95
In Out of Now art becomes a vehicle for radical transformation, a rewriting of a life that is nothing short of remarkable.

Not if but when: Culture Beyond Oil - Book Cover
Not if but when: Culture Beyond Oil
Eds. Jo Clarke, Mel Evans, Hayley Newman, Kevin Smith, Glen Tarman
Free PDF Online
If Art can be a vehicle for social change, then it must also recognise its frequent culpability in perpetuating capitalism and ecological harm, as in the toxic ongoing relationship between art and oil.

Gardens Speak - Book Cover
Gardens Speak
Tania El Khoury
£9 / Original Price £12
Tania is an extraordinary artist and this piece is the best example I can point to of the potential for the tangibility of live performance to change the way we relate to geopolitics and mediatized suffering.

Cassils - Book Cover
Cassils: Artist Books
David J. Getsy and Julia Steinmetz
£23.63 / Original Price £31.50
Cassils’ work is doing something in the world.

4 Boys [For Beuys] - Book Cover
4 Boys [For Beuys]
The Institute for the Art and Practice of Dissent at Home
£3 / Original Price £4
The Institute is a remarkable example of an activist practice that is deeply embedded in ordinariness of everyday life, they are a map to another kind of resistance.

It's All Allowed - Book Cover
It's All Allowed: The Performances of Adrian Howells
Eds. Deirdre Heddon & Dominic Johnson
£15 / Original Price £20
Adrian brought so much beauty and compassion into the world and I miss him very much.

Theaster Gates - Book Cover
Theaster Gates
Eds. Carol Becker, Lisa Yun Lee, Achim Borchardt-Hume
£22.46 / Original Price £29.95
In the info for this book Theaster Gates is described as "The poster boy for socially engaged art" and it makes me want to be sick a bit in my mouth, but you should read this book anyway.

Not Just a Mirror - Book Cover
Not Just a Mirror: Looking for the Political Theatre of Today
Ed. Florian Malzacher
£8.24 / Original Price £10.99
There is so much in this book you will definitely find something to cling to, and something to hope for.

Forest Fringe - Book Cover
Forest Fringe: The First Ten Years
Forest Fringe
£10.50 / Original Price £14
This is our book. You should buy our book

June 15, 2017

Books › LADA Titles › Launches ›



Giulia Palladini and Marco Pustianaz - The Making of Our Lexicon

The full editors’ Introduction to Lexicon for an Affective Archive is available as a PDF download 

Adieu. Welcome.

Introductions are often written at the end, when the book that is just beyond their threshold has in fact already been written. Therefore, they resemble more the words of an adieu. The book is being archived, packed up, and closed. On the other hand, this is perhaps the first time when we, as its curators, glimpse the existence of our book as such, now that it is taking the shape that will distinguish it from all the others. For the first time the book knows that the time has come. We settle our accounts with what has been gathered inside, ready to close the gates, so that they can be opened again. The movements of closure and opening—mimicked by your turning the pages again and again—are folded one into the other, like the recto and verso of a page. What holds them together is the temporary absence of reading that is filled up with a suspended breath, a tiny affect of a hand moving, of eyes remembering and anticipating. Nothing is ostensibly happening, yet this is one moment of decision, of eventful suspension. You are the agents of time, the harbingers of a new arkhè, or beginning. You are treating the archive as though it had not yet been closed. By doing so you become capable of turning it against itself. There will be no rest in this archive, now that you have come.

- Giulia Palladini and Marco Pustianaz

Published by Intellect, NInA and Live Art Development Agency with the support of University of Roehampton’s Department of Drama, Theatre and Performance.

Guest Editor, Robert Daniels

Guest Editor Sale from 1 May 2017 - 31 May 2017

Robert Daniels is a Senior Lecturer in Theatre at The University of Chichester, and leads on their MA in Performance (Theatre/Theatre Collectives) programme. He's also joint Artistic Director of Bootworks Theatre, and author of DIY and DIY Too (available on Unbound).

"Imagine we're in an over-emphatic, jubilantly ecstatic, evangelical event... you know, the kind that's equally at home in an opulent stone and glass palace as it is a conference centre, stadium or tent... all singy-dancey, and full of ecstasy and hysteria.

... the one where the frail old lady with arthritis shuffles up to the stage. The preacher, all maroon-faced, sweaty and shiny - with as much pomp and majesty as he can muster - lays his hands upon her head, screams instructions (to a ‘something’: not-in-the-room, but sort-of floating above), and squarely punches her into the arms of expectant, immaculately suited, assistants. The crowd swoons. People faint. The ‘demon’ has been 'released'.

Next week she'll shuffle up to the stage and ask the preacher to cure her whiplash.

This is what I think of when I imagine a lot of (mainstream) “Theatre”: masses of people blindly, dogmatically, following an orthodox (and more often than not, some kind of guru), willfully stepping up to get smacked down... replacing one pain with another. Supposing that this is all some kind of miracle cure, and trampling on any heathen that thinks or says (or does) differently. Same goes for “Art”, “Live Art”, “Dance”… whatever your poison. Same shit different day. I dislike reverence. I dislike obtuse and esoteric ‘theory’, and fluffy notions of ‘purity; or ‘truth’ in a lot of discourse (in/with ‘the Arts’ in particular).

Don't misunderstand me though, my analogy to religious evangelicalism is not obtuse. Or particularly rebuking. I'm agnostic, so I do believe in having faith. For me, there's simply something about it all that reminds me of the witticism (variously attributed to Einstein, Franklin and Twain) that "insanity is doing something over and over again and expecting a different result.”, and I think this true of the way in which our ‘Arts’, cultural industries, the academy, and arts ecology have dawdled their way into a state of such inadequacy and imbalance.

… Ok… I’ve perhaps started this a little over-emphatically myself. Let me explain… you see, as an ‘academic’ (as well as an artist) I’ve had to read a look of books. That’s all. And I’m just often surprised (and fairly bored) with wave after mutual-masturbatory wave of reverence and platitudes towards artists and work - when (because of said reading) I’ve seen it all before. Too many books - too - are rolled out and waste trees on the same old boring people and subjects too.

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with all this per se - some work/ideas (etc.) needs to be repeated (and sometimes it’s ‘better’ too) - but I just feel too often that despite apparently working in a much-better-than-before ecology of the arts, I’m constantly in need of reminding myself of the difference between what I’m ‘supposed’ to like, and what I actually like. Or, what is ‘good’ and what is actually ‘good’.

That’s one of the reasons I often use LADA and Unbound as a resource: it gives space and voice to a lot of stuff I’ve not seen or heard of before (or rather: a range of work I think should be seen and heard of more).

As a maker, I recognise I’m also courting a certain kind of scrutiny at my own work. The kind you might get if you’re a maker and also a ‘reviewer’ of other’s work (which I’ve also done). Let’s be clear: in no way am I claiming to be an iconoclast or something ‘better’… I just don’t like doing or believing in things ‘just because’, and I don’t like it if I can’t get my hands dirty and have a go at something ‘new’, or ‘different’… or perhaps just the same, just on my own terms.

My interest in "DIY" (performance) is especially rooted in this predicament. I’m drawn to the notion (and ethics and symbolic metaphor) of doing it oneself: crafting, learning, teaching, sharing, giving, making, experiencing… finding another way… working it out… and so on.

All these, for me, are highly political things to do too. Live Art and contemporary performance have a rich history of this kind of thinking and doing.

"DIY" might suggest isolationist positions but this is a simplistic (mis)understanding. The majority of everything I do as an artist or teacher is with others... directly (as in my relationship to my collaborators in Bootworks) or tacitly (as a teacher in HE). My books are an attempt to make sense of nearly 20 years of doing it ‘myself’, and helping others to do the same. They, also, give space to a range of Art makers and doers (emerging and established) to share, articulate, and promote their practices. In Bootworks, we embrace a sense of partnership with our audiences, with much of our work built around structures for co-authorship, interaction and participation. As a teacher - despite my role as 'authority' and leader - I'm often making and learning with my students... or at least helping them to make and learn.

DIY is - for me - about independence. The joy and reward of doing it with my own hands, for better or worse, and the physical feeling of having crafted and made something, from kit or from scratch. Books are still the most crucial places in which I learn to do things myself. They are almost always more reliable than the Internet (but the Internet is also good… just saying).

The unread/read ratio of my own book collection is about 60/40. I just keep getting them... adding them to the pile... admiring them. I have a bit of a fetish. Of the 40% read, most are re-read, and routinely referred to and used. These are my favourite kinds of books: ones you can use. Not as a doorstop (sometimes as a doorstop)... but as a teacher, and maker: to feed, instruct, inspire, stimulate… and sometimes as evidence, reason, purpose, context and to better understand what has come before, and what is yet to come.

Therefore my focus, as this month’s guest editor is on books that share practice and promote making: books and editions that try to articulate practice, and some artist-made books. Most index DIY, some don’t, but elaborate or underpin some of the work I do. Books by people that “DIY”, books that helps others “DIY”, and books that are (have been) “DIY”. I’ll only promote the ones I actually have too… without a doubt there are many on Unbound that are great, but I’ve not seen or got yet… but seeing as my own work is rooted in contemporary theatre/performance and that’s still an under-represented area in book form, I’ll also give a little focus to the companies, artists and collectives like my own, currently stocked on Unbound."

PLAYING UP: A Live Art Game for Kids and Adults

PLAYING UP: A Live Art Game for Kids and Adults
Sibylle Peters
£9 / Original Price £12

Without a doubt one of the most important resources available for Live Art and young people IN THE WORLD. This edition should be a continued resource, updated and added to. I only actually got it just because I missed out on getting a coveted copy of LADA’s The Performance Pack… which I’m still searching for… but when I unwrapped and read it I realised I’d accidentally bought my favourite resource of last year. Expansion packs LADA?

The Many Headed Monster

The Many Headed Monster
Joshua Sofaer
£26.25 / Original Price £35

A great resource. Some more books coming out/already out on space/site/audience contexts, but none as performative, and as well designed and packaged as this.

Richard Dedomenici Is Still An Artist

Richard Dedomenici Is Still An Artist
Richard Dedomenici
£3.75 / Original Price £5

I must recommend this little beauty of a book. I didn’t actually get it from Unbound, I found it in a (particular Bristol gallery) shop. I’m always on the lookout for little books like this (see Sheila Ghelani’s book also listed below) and think they’re just the best thing. I like this one in particular because it’s playful, interesting, and simple, just like Richard ;) x

Gob Squad, Do It Yourself

Gob Squad, Do It Yourself
Gob Squad
£18.75 / Original Price £25 

Because you should… always. This DVD is a really well designed and packaged filmed workshop of their general practice. I thought before I watched it that I would get insight into the genius of their work… because they are without a doubt one of my absolute favourite collectives… what I got was something grounded in simplicity and a play-through of some (for me) very ‘usual’ exercises. I like them more for demystifying themselves.

Gob Squad and the Impossible Attempt to Make Sense of it All

Gob Squad and the Impossible Attempt to Make Sense of it All
Gob Squad
£8.25 / Original Price £11

Lovely binding. Delicate. Great design. A little repetitive, but that’s kind of the point: well-known works are brought up and discussed through the book and you notice little changes each time as it continues… as if repeating the story over and over makes them tell it better. It does. What a lovely book.

The Making of a Memory

The Making of a Memory
Gob Squad
£9.75 / Original Price £13

I love the fact that this book allows and incorporates reflections and recalled memories that might not be actually true… I like Gob Squad, OK? They’re fucking heroes.

A Choreographer's Handbook

A Choreographer's Handbook
Jonathan Burrows
£14.24 / Original Price £18.99

I’m always reminding myself (and my students) of Burrows’ confession that the worst piece he made was when he tried too hard to make a piece of ‘experimental dance’, and ended up “making a piece about making a piece”. I feel you, Jonathan…. too often.

A Mis-Guide to Anywhere

A Mis-Guide to Anywhere
Eds. Wrights and Sites
£7.50 / Original Price £10

THE template for making site specific/responsive/generic (whatever your site relationship/connection) work. When I talk about wanting books I can ‘use’, I mean ones like this especially.

A Sardine Street Box of Tricks

A Sardine Street Box of Tricks
Crab Man and Signpost
£5.63 / Original Price £7.50

This book was the template for our 30 days to Edinburgh project. A perfectly simple and frank account of working with/in “the street”. Phil Smith writes in such a way that makes acute, obtuse theory seem completely easy to understand. This book breaks things down for the maker in clearly understood ways, weaving anecdote, and personal experience with argument and critical insight. A writer that knows what he’s on about not because he’s read all the books, but because he’s got the bloody t-shirt.

Rambles with Nature

Rambles with Nature
Eds Sheila Ghelani and Divya Ghelani
£7.50 / Original Price £10

This is a gorgeous little book. A performance in literary form. An example of a self-made book that is just as carefully crafted, and brilliantly written/devised, as the work they make.

Forest Fringe: The First Ten Years

Forest Fringe: The First Ten Years
Forest Fringe
£10.50 / Original Price £14

What should be stocked is Forest’s Paper Stages books… but this will more than do… Forest are hugely important to me and Bootworks, as they were (are) the only place that could give our niche work space at the EdFringe. Artist-led, and not-just-for-artists, they blaze trails - still - for independent/alternative work to exist and thrive at the biggest arts market in the world.

Certain Fragments

Certain Fragments
Tim Etchells
£20.99 / Original Price £27.99

Why is this book still relevant? It’s like 20 years old for Christ’s sake! Well, it IS still relevant. And so are Forced Entertainment… completely essential reading. When this book came out I was an undergrad, and there was literally only Oddey’s “Devising Theatre” book that gave an account of making (devised theatre). Not a single word or point in Certain Fragments feels out of date (whereas Oddey’s book… need I say more!). This book will last forever. I hope. A fucking BIBLE for students of theatre and performance making.

Exercises for Rebel Artists

Exercises for Rebel Artists
Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Roberto Sifuentes
£14.99 / Original Price £19.99

Near the end there’s a list of ‘rules’, one of them goes something like: “respect and revere your elders, then kill them ritualistically”… need I say more? From what I learned as a student about his practice and works, I expected Gomez-Pena to be an uber-radical, flamboyant and aggressive artist. When I met him, he was soft-voiced, generous with his time and thought, completely absorbing, and beautifully kind. This book is about as generous as you can get when it comes to sharing your practice.

Good Luck Everybody: Lone Twin

Good Luck Everybody: Lone Twin
Eds. David Williams and Carl Lavery
£25.13 / Original Price £33.50

“If you can’t say what you’re doing in one sentence, then you shouldn’t do it.” So they say. Or something like that. If only more artists tried this mantra. A superb account and ‘theorising’ of one of the best art-duo’s in the UK. If only we all had people like Carl Lavery and David Williams writing about us… or just Carl and David (absolutely stunning academics!). Exceptionally lucid and rigorous writing… perfectly easy on the eyes too.

All Work and No Plays: Blueprints for Nine Theatre Performances by Ontroerend Goed

All Work and No Plays: Blueprints for Nine Theatre Performances by Ontroerend Goed
Ontroerend Goed
£15 / Original Price £20

This is surely the best current template for articulating and ‘scripting’ contemporary devised performance out there: their work always feels ‘young’ (and while the company generally are, the directors, I know, are not)… and in that sense of ‘youth’ one feels something beautiful. The kind of spirit only young work and artists can have: raw, honest, precarious, idealistic, and bombastic. Bloody glorious. This book gives ‘ingredients’, ‘recipe’ and script for all their work to date. And it is absolutely fascinating.

Action Plans: Selected Performance Pieces

Action Plans: Selected Performance Pieces
Action Hero
£11.24 / Original Price £14.99

Seeing their work in ‘script’ form is weird. So much of what Gemma and James do - for me - is purely about the ‘event’ experience and liveness. I LOVE watching them perform. Their ideas are super-fucking-cool, and I like their process too. Seeing them play with the format of how their work can be documented and presented in such a holistic and practical way is completely brilliant.

The Forest and the Field

The Forest and the Field
Chris Goode
£11.24 / Original Price £14.99

Chris’ book came out just after mine. I remember trying to make a spat about Peter Brook’s Empty Space, but never really having the balls - or vocabulary - to properly break it down. Then I read his SUPERB deconstruction… and I just wanted to have his literary babies… lovely writing. His podcast should be on your iThingy too.

Schoolbook 2

Schoolbook 2
Goat Island
£7.50 / Original Price £10

Basically, if you don’t own this, you should. Period. It’s full of tasks and practical insight. And if you’re one of the lucky few people who actually have a copy of Schoolbook 1 I will literally do ANYTHING you want for it.

Here's to another 10

Here's to another 10
LOW PROFILE
£5.24 / Original Price £6.99

LOW PROFILE are great. This book is great. Seriously. This is a great example of how (and why) indie sector makers should document and articulate their body of work. LOW PROFILE are also brilliant makers and people. A great example of artists who didn’t have to suck London’s cock in order to make it. Their individual and collective practice is diverse and difficult to label, but I’ll always look to them as examples of artists that holistically empower, serve and drive their local community, and relationship to the public. I’ve said ‘great’ a lot. I feel like I’m writing a Donald Trump speech. Not that his speeches are ‘written’. More like a crayon spewed up by a cat.

Invisible Things

Invisible Things
Fevered Sleep
£13.49 / Original Price £17.99
A simple and original way to document and articulate practice, and one’s work. The different page types, paper stock, and non linear arrangement: it satisfies all my artist-book desires. They’re a great company, with some epically beautiful work. It’s great that the design allows them to speak about and articulate their work in multiple perspectives, keeping the vocabularies and languages neat, while letting them overlap, literally.

Perform Every Day

Perform Every Day
Joshua Sofaer
£9 / Original Price £12

I love/hate this book. A massive tome considering its physical content, with lots of empty space… but I think that’s the point. Superbly simple, and accessible. If Keri Smith wrote a book on Live Art, it would probably be something like this.

The Dust Archive

The Dust Archive
Alexander Kelly and Annie Lloyd
£11.25 / Original Price £15

What a wonderfully perfect book/idea this is. Its premise and concept is so gloriously simple, and its result so perfectly succinct and cogent. You know that cliché rule in theatre making: “don’t just say it, show it”… this is a book that does just that.

and if you’re rich enough, go buy ALL of Forced Entertainment’s, Gob Squad’s, and Blast Theory’s DVDs.

Finally though… simply because they’re FREE - FREE GODDAMMIT:

Foundations

Foundations
The Free University of Liverpool

Splat! The Adventures of Little Bitch: Part One

Splat! The Adventures of Little Bitch: Part One
The Famous Lauren Barri Holstein and Alethea Raban

Guest Editor, Andrea Pagnes

Guest Editor Sale from 1 March 2017 - 31 March 2017

We are introducing a series of guest editors for our Unbound Newsletters. Each editor will write about how titles we stock on Unbound have informed, inspired and shaped their creative practice and select titles on artists that have specifically influenced them. These titles will be offered at a discount for that month. 

Andrea Pagnes, artist, performer and writer at VestAndPage (with Verena Stenke), and founder of the Live Art exhibition project Venice International Performance Art Week (VIPAW) has chosen 14 titles which offer an insight into some of the artists that have participated live and/or exhibited in the three editions of VIPAW. These exclusive and related publications are an address to all those who wish to know more about the art and life of these incredible artists.

"When I perform, I usually search for my inner silence. I balance the images passing through my mind and try that rhythm in action when I write about performance. However, after reading books on performance art by other authors, essays, and monographs on artists which are so dear to me and inspirational for my work, I feel that those words, photos and sketches accompany me in the experience of living in slow motion, while the world outside speeds without stopping. I see a page of a book as the access key to know more, in depth, and understand different things and perspectives – a place at the edge of the quotidian, right there to host me, when I am at a crucial point in my life, looking for that “which" to start again. I think it's always wise to feel part of a place, a subject, a part of a present, which is already past but renewed when it is acknowledged. This is also such stuff as books are made on." Andrea Pagnes, February 2017

Read Andrea's thoughts on each title below.


Stelarc
Stelarc A Monograph
Ed. Marquard Smith
£14.96 / Original Price £19.95
Suspensions, robotic research, obsolescence of the human body. Still the most comprehensive tool to acquaint the exceptional artistic path of one of the most experimental performance art masters ever.

Bas Jan Ader: Death is Elsewhere
Bas Jan Ader: Death is Elsewhere
Alexander Dumbadze
£14.62 / Original Price £19.50
"Have you heard of happiness, springing from a deep well of sorrow? Of love, springing from pain and despondency, agony and death? Such is mine." (BJA)

Alexander Dumbadze, with his engaging, compelling style of art writing delivers a complete insight navigating across the romantic aura and the refined conceptualism of one of the most sensitive artists of our time.

Pleading in the Blood: The Art and Performances of Ron Athey
Pleading in the Blood: The Art and Performances of Ron Athey
Ed. Dominic Johnson
£10 / Original Price £22.50

And

Hallelujah! Ron Athey: A Story of Deliverance
Hallelujah! Ron Athey: A Story of Deliverance
Ron Athey (DVD)
£12 / Original Price £16
'Volo ut sis', said St. Augustine about love and therefore existence: 'I want you to be who you are'. Without trying to change you and not trying to change me to please you.

These two outstanding titles are “a must have” to understand in depth Ron Athey, both the man and the artist, crystalline in his courage, ideas, and beliefs which he has always professed in his art without compromise.

I Still Love
I Still Love
Franko B
£26.25 / Original Price £35
Curated by Francesca Alfano Miglietti at PAC (Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea of Milan), this is the catalogue raisonné of the first exhibition dedicated to Franko in an Italian public exhibition space. Looking at his works, I cannot help but think about a sentence of Jean Luc Nancy from his essay L’Intrus (2002): “To isolate death from life – not leaving each one intimately woven into the other, with each one intruding upon the other’s core (coeur) – this is what one must never do.” As Heraclitus put, here it is not just a matter of making the unbearable bearable, but that to love is also to live the other’s death, and dying the other’s life. And this is also the great lesson of Franko.

Out of Now: The Lifeworks of Tehching Hsieh
Out of Now: The Lifeworks of Tehching Hsieh
Adrian Heathfield and Tehching Hsieh, 
£18.75 / Original Price £25
For all the ones that want to know why “You have to make art stronger than life so people can feel it” (TH) the exhaustive volume on the legendary Taiwanese master compiled by Adrian Heathfield gives you the reason.

Orlan: A Hybrid Body of Artworks
ORLAN: A Hybrid Body of Artworks
Simon Donger with Simon Shepherd and ORLAN,
£17.99 / Original Price £23.99
A book of a different kind that contains a series of texts collected in an apparent unruly way, but for this, however is rigorous and mostly passionate. The fascinating analysis of ORLAN’s seminal practice is rendered through exciting ideas that overlap and help us to explore and dissect her complex universe.

Guillermo Gómez-Peña: Conversations Across Borders

Guillermo Gómez-Peña: Conversations Across Borders
Ed. Laura Levin
£21 / Original Price £28 

And

Homo Fronterizus: Recent performance video works, 2008-2011
Homo Fronterizus: Recent performance video works, 2008-2011
Guillermo Gómez-Peña (DVD)
£16.88 / Original Price £22.50
Guillermo is one of the brightest thinker, vate, activist and performer of our contemporaneity. His words are profound, humorous, poetic, uncompromised, rhythmic, and mercilessly truthful. His performances are hymns to life and a call to keep position against hypocrisy and injustice.
Exercises for Rebel Artists
Exercises for Rebel Artists
Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Roberto Sifuentes, 
£14.99 / Original Price £19.99
Anytime we give a performance art workshop, we offer this book to read to our participants.
Access All Areas: Live Art and Disability
Access All Areas: Live Art and Disability
Eds. Lois Keidan and CJ Mitchell
£13.13 / Original Price £17.50
Then one day we find out not to be perfect, to fight against a disease, to grow up and grow old differently. The performer is not an actor. S/he doesn’t interpret nor represent but purely s/he puts her/himself face to face with the other. Author of his every action and very own thought, s/he’s authentic and sincere for s/he always acts only him/herself. Poetry, courage and beauty often occur more readily in difficult places, in segregated bodies made silent from pain, becoming expression of a deeper self. Transforming the terrible into the sublime or more simply indicating if as a quality of the real, the performer questions and makes us think upon existence, to reconcile us with life through art.

Hold It Against Me
Hold It Against Me
Jennifer Doyle
£12.74 / Original Price £16.99
Finally an authorial fierce book unpacking the importance of feelings and emotions in contemporary art and performance, which the too arid conceptual (male) driven art discourses have purposely avoided for decades.

The Art of Living: An Oral History of Performance Art
The Art of Living: An Oral History of Performance Art
Dominic Johnson
£16.49 / Original Price £21.99
How to question and tell of performance art?
Dominic Johnson’s skill and sensibility in asking penetrating questions to 12 performers on their own practice, how to introduce them precisely to the reader with a poignant overview on their works, makes of this book also an instrument for anyone who wish to learn or refined how to approach write and narrate of performance matters.

Encounters
Encounters
Manuel Vason
£7.50 / Original Price £10
A volume that contains some of the most beautiful performances images ever taken, born from the dedicated collaboration between Manuel Vason, artist and photo-performer, and several performance artists. Still hard to choose which is my favourite picture.

Andrea Pagnes (VestAndPage)

Unbound Seasonal Sale 2016

Credits: Katy Baird, Alex Eisenberg and Drew Cole. A LADA Production (2016)

25% discount on all books and DVDs in the Unbound Seasonal Sale. Pick up the perfect Christmas present for your Live Art loved ones, or treat yourself this winter. 

Last orders for UK delivery before Christmas must be placed by Midday on Monday 19 December. Delivery dispatches start again on Thursday 5 January. No deliveries will be dispatched between Midday Monday 19 December and Thursday 5 January.

Sale ends Saturday 14 January. 

Unbound Seasonal Advert 2016 from LADA - Live Online on Vimeo.

November 25, 2016

Books › LADA Titles ›



New LADA Title: Turn, Turtle! Reenacting The Institute



The Performing Urgency series entangles both the arts and wider societal issues, resulting in its publications becoming key books when discussing the position of artistic practice within an extremely volatile and ever changing cultural and political landscape.

Turn, Turtle! Reenacting The Institute is the newest addition to the series coming at a time where the British public are still nursing their Brexit hangover and working to comprehend the severe attitudes of uncertainty and doubt within existing power structures. These worries obviously seep into the artistic sphere where ‘public funding of social, educational, scientific, and cultural institutions is under pressure due to state cuts and privatisation’.

Turn, Turtle! is comprised of six essays, three interviews, and six case studies of performance makers, institution directors, and thinkers. The book itself is broken into five parts, which cover a plethora of current economic issues and cultural concerns whilst also offering insightful solutions in engagement and reassignment of cultural power structures.

With the current mood of frustration with governing structures in the arts, the role of the institution is a topic which will arise in conversation more frequently than we all would like to admit. It is for this reason that this book is an invaluable resource in giving even the newest of arts readers an informative rethinking of the ‘functioning, position, and decision-taking structure of the organisations’ within the performing arts community.

Buy Now

Written by Drew Cole

Resources and Online Development Placement.

November 17, 2016

Criticism › LADA Titles ›



Religious Studies Review - Pleading in the Blood: the Art and Performances of Ron Athey



Jeremy Biles has written a review for the Religious Studies Review on Pleading in the Blood: the Art and Performances of Ron Athey edited by Dominic Johnson.

"Pleading in the Blood is essential reading for scholars of religion working at the intersection of ritual, performance, and contemporary art practices, as well as those with interest in abjection, gender and sexuality, the AIDS crisis, charismatic Christianity, and the construction of religious identity."

Read the full review.

Buy Pleading in the Blood: the Art and Performances of Ron Athey
, now available at discount price.